Address: 385 Viking Way Ashville, OH 43103   Phone: 740.983.5000
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Elementary Math Support
Q: What are Ohio’s New Learning Standards?
A: Ohio’s New Learning Standards form the basis for Ohio’s Model Curricula. These mathematics model curricula were written by Ohio educators to support the implementation of Ohio's New Learning Standards in Mathematics. Model Curricula by grade level can be found on the district website under Department and Curriculum.

Q: What is the math content my student is expected to know and be able to do?
A: Ohio’s New Learning Standards were developed to provide all students with the focused, coherent, and challenging mathematics content they are expected to know and be able to do at every grade level or high school course. Prior to Ohio’s New Learning Standards, the standards for each grade level were extensive. In contrast, Ohio’s New Learning Standards identify the most critical content at each grade/course level; build upon learning and understanding from previous years to help prepare students for new learning; and thus, give students additional time to learn the content provided for each grade level.

A few resources that you might find helpful are outlined below.

Under the Parent Tab of the Teays Valley website you can find several information guides such as “Guides to Student Success” published by the National PTA and “Elementary Parent Guides” which were written at the district level. You can locate information about standards at each grade level by going to the District link on the website and going to Curriculum.

Q: Why can’t teachers just teach the way I learned?
A: If you don’t recognize the math in your student’s classwork or homework, think about how the world has changed since you were in school. The mathematics looks different because the world is different. Advances in science, technology, information processing and communication, combined with the changing workplace; make it necessary for all students to learn more mathematics. Business and industry demand workers who can:

solve real world problems
explain their thinking to others
identify and analyze trends in data, and
use modern technology.

In their mathematics classes, students will learn and practice the mathematics for their grade using the four strategies listed above. You will see a shift from pages of individual problems to seeing single and multiple step real life problems that students often solve individually, with a partner or in a small group. Students are encouraged to think through and discuss the problem and solution with others. Students will often be writing to explain how they solved a problem using precise vocabulary and steps that were used to solve the problem. Over time, teachers guide students to use correct and efficient procedures to find the right answers.

If teachers are using strategies you are unfamiliar with, first ask your student’s teacher for help. You can also visit Carroll County Public Schools and Hilliard City Schools for videos of strategies teachers may be using.

Carroll County Public Schools

Hilliard City Schools

Additional suggestions for helping your student learn today’s mathematics:
  • Be Positive About Mathematics. If you tell your student mathematics was hard for you to do or you did not like mathematics, this may influence them to think that mathematics will be too hard for them to learn too. Encourage your student to have a positive attitude and enjoy math.
  • Value Mistakes. View mistakes as a learning process, not a penalty. We all learn from our mistakes, help your student identify their own errors. This way they can correct their own mistakes and learn where they were incorrect in their thinking.
  • Involve your student in the mathematics you use on a daily bases. Use tasks such as, cooking, shopping, home repairs or projects to your student how mathematics is used every day. This URL provides a free copy of the booklet, “Helping Your Child Learn Math”. This booklet provides suggestions and activities to use with your student such as Math At Home, Math On The Go, Math at the Grocery store, and more.

http://www2.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/math/index.html

Turn off the TV and play games. Students can learn a lot of mathematics while playing games. Games such as checkers, chess, dominoes, Yahtzee, other board games, and card games which involve counting, problem solving and strategies. There many games that provide practice and help reinforce specific mathematics contents.

Q: How do I help my student if they need additional support in mathematics?
A: Begin with your student’s teacher; talk to them to develop a plan for additional support. You may also ask the teacher for log-in and password information for Moby Max.

Q: How can I help my student with their mathematics homework?
A: Grades 1 and 2:
  • Set a regular time for homework
  • Pick a place that is quiet and without distractions
  • Go over the directions to find out if your student understands what to do
  • Ask your student if they know where to begin, assist them in getting started, but resist the temptation to do the homework for your student
  • When solving word problems, as students, “How could you describe the problem in your own words? Can you draw a picture of the problem?”

Q: How do I help my student learn basic facts?
A: By grade level:

Suggestions for Kindergarten Students:
  • Count to 100 by tens and ones
  • Verbally count by tens when riding in the car or count steps when walking
  • Look for picture books that involve counting by tens or by ones
  • Use materials to make groups of tens and count them
  • Use a hundreds chart to count and find the patterns for counting by tens and by ones
  • 30 Things You Can Do with a Hundreds Chart
  • When counting objects, say the number name in order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one object
  • Have students count groups of objects found in your home
  •    Give students a number and have them make a group of objects, found in your home, to math the number given.
  • Have students make a group of objects from a number given, for example 5. Have students ‘decompose’ or break down those total number of objects into two smaller groups. So 5 total objects can be decomposed to groups of 2 and 3 or 1 and 4 or 5 and 0. Repeat with other numbers.
Give students small objects found in your home (buttons, paper clips, small blocks etc) Make up simple addition and subtraction story problems for them to act out with the objects.(up to 10) Students can also draw a picture of the story problem and write the numbers that match each set.
Reference Ohio’s Model Curriculum for resources reference in Question 1.

Suggestions for Students in Grade 1 and 2:

Before students begin to memorize the basic facts, they need to understand the meaning of addition and subtraction. First, look at the classwork and homework that is coming home. Use that as a guide to create other problems or activities that are similar to those your teacher has created. Students begin learning the facts with different types of strategies. This URL provides a list of the types of mental mathematics strategies many teachers use to help students learn the basic facts.

http://hanlonmath.com/pdfFiles/244StrategiesforFactsBH.pdf

A word of caution, many times students are expected to learn the facts using flash cards and multiple page problems. These types of activities simply ask students to recall facts they have not learned and do not help them learn the facts. There are appropriate to use once students have demonstrated they can recall the facts accurately. There are many resources that are appropriate once students learn the facts.

These activities are examples of other ways to help your student learn the facts in addition to using the mental mathematics strategies found in the URL mentioned above.

Practice the facts by playing games with number cubes (dice) or cards. You could play card games such as War, by having the student draw two cards and add the numbers to determine the winner who has the highest number. A variation for this game would be to roll two dice (number cubes) write down the two numbers rolled and add them for the answer.

Use dominoes, have your student add the two sets of numbers on the domino place them together.

You can also have students use the dominoes to play a memory game. Select 4-5 pairs of dominoes that show the same total amount. Turn them upside down, in rows and columns. Have your student turn over two dominoes at a time. If the pair matches, remove that pair from the rest. Play until all the pairs are matched up.

Suggestions for Students in Grades 3-5:
Practice the facts by playing games with number cubes (dice) or cards. You could play card games such as War, by having the student draw two cards and add the numbers to determine the winner who has the highest number. A variation for this game would be to roll two dice (number cubes) write down the two numbers rolled and multiply them for the answer.
Use dominoes, have your student multiply the two sets of numbers on the domino place them together. You can also have students use the dominoes to play a memory game. Select 4-5 pairs of dominoes that show the same total amount. Turn them upside down, in rows and columns. Have the students turn over two dominoes at a time. If the pair matches, remove that pair from the rest. Play until all the pairs are matched up.
Play Circles and Stars- You will need one dice (number cube), plan paper and pencil.

Students rolls the number cube. This roll tells students how many circles to draw. Roll the number cube again. This second roll tells students how many stars to circle inside of each circle. Students can do several things. 1. have students add the numbers in all the circles and then write the multiplication fact that the circles and stars show. For example if on two rolls your student shows 3 circles of 4 stars, the addition problem would be 4+4+4=12, the multiplication fact would be 3 x 4 = 12 (3 groups of 4 equal 12). Have students continue to roll the number cube to draw circles and stars and practice writing and learning their multiplication facts.

Q: Why are students writing in math class? Why is my teachers asking them to explain their answer?
A: Teachers are using writing in mathematics class to help students reflect on their learning. As students put their thoughts onto paper using words, symbols, numbers, and drawings it helps them make sense of the mathematics they are learning and deepen their own understanding. Teachers also use student’s writing to assess their understanding and can often identify misunderstandings or areas of confusion. Writing in math class starts with students verbally talking with their peers and working out problems with partners. The mathematics class today is filled with discussions and conversations about the math work they are doing and the problems they are solving. 

When you are working with your student at home, you could ask your student to draw a picture of the problem they are solving. Then ask them to label the drawing or write words or phrases to tell what they did first, second, this, so on. For young learners, have students draw pictures of the mathematics they are doing and tell you what the pictures represent.
Teays Valley Local Schools
385 Viking Way
Ashville, OH 43103
P: 740.983.5000
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